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On June 12, the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) and Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) released new sanctions and export controls intended to further target Russia and Belarus, as well as those who transact with sanctioned entities and create diversion risks for export-controlled items.

New restrictions on certain IT and software services, effective

Effective May 17, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is adding 26 China-based cotton traders and warehouse facilities to the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) Entity List based on the U.S. government’s reasonable cause to believe the entities source or sell cotton from China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (Xinjiang). These companies will now be

President Biden issued an order requiring a Chinese-owned crypto mining company to vacate and sell certain real property and remove equipment from land in close proximity to Warren Air Force Base (AFB) in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

In June 2022, the crypto mining company acquired 12.06 acres within 1 mile of the Warren AFB, a strategic missile

On May 14, the Office of U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) published its report on the four-year review of the Section 301 tariffs on Chinese-origin goods first imposed in 2018. The report concludes that the tariffs have been effective, but China has not yet eliminated the technology transfer-related acts, policies, and practices at issue in the

On Friday, the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) published an interim final rule that will amend the Report, Procedures and Penalties Regulations, 31 C.F.R. Part 501, effective August 8, 2024. The updates include:

  • Electronic filing and submission requirements: Filers will generally be required to use the electronic OFAC Reporting System (ORS) to submit (1)

Although aid to Israel, Ukraine, and Taiwan made headlines last month when President Biden signed H.R. 815, the law also significantly expanded the scope of agencies’ enforcement authority under two key national security laws: the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) and the Trading with the Enemy Act (TWEA). Both now have 10-year civil

Last fall, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) paused its issuance of new export licenses involving certain firearms, related “parts,” “components,” and ammunition. On April 30, BIS will publish an interim final rule tightening controls of exports of these items. The interim final rule will take effect on May 30.

The interim final rule

To expand the reach of U.S. sanctions, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) amended the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) on March 21 to require a license for the export, reexport, or transfer (in-country) of all items “subject to the EAR” when a party to the transaction is blocked under one of 14 U.S. sanctions

After Venezuela’s government and its political opposition agreed on electoral guarantees for 2024 presidential elections, the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issued four general licenses suspending select sanctions:

  • General License 44 temporarily authorizes all transactions related to Venezuelan oil and gas sector operations, including producing, lifting, selling, and exporting oil or gas from Venezuela and new investment in oil or gas sector operations. The authorization includes transactions involving Petróleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PdVSA) or any entity in which PdVSA directly or indirectly owns a 50% or greater interest.

    The license expires on April 18, 2024. OFAC will only renew the license if Maduro’s government follows through with its commitments and continues taking measurable steps toward democratic elections in 2024.

  • General License 43 authorizes transactions involving CVG Compania General de Mineria de Venezuela CA (known as Minerven), the state-owned gold mining company.
  • General License 3I and General License 9H remove the secondary market trading bans on buying certain Venezuelan sovereign bonds, as well as pre-2017 PdVSA bonds or equity.

Continue Reading Overview: U.S. eases Venezuela-related sanctions after election deal

As a follow-on to last week’s quint-seal guidance, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) published best practice guidance to help prevent high-priority items from being diverted to Russia. The latest guidance focuses on exports of the following high-priority items to counterparties in countries outside the Global Export Controls Coalition (GECC):[1]

HS Code